Links for specific writing problems

Transitions to connect sentences

Transition words can help you to improve the flow of your writing. These are words like “next, then, in addition, as a result, however,” etc. that connect sentences, paragraphs, or sections to each other logically. The links below are useful but remember that different transitions are more common in different fields. You can check which words are most common by using Adobe Acrobat advanced search functions in the Computer-assisted writing section of this site.

Technical writing transitions

http://www.io.com/~hcexres/tcm1603/acchtml/hirev1.html#trans

General writing transitions

http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/style/transitioncues.html

http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/transitions.htm#transitions

Sentence Fragments

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_frag.html

Present Perfect Tense vs Past Tense: http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/ppvpast.htm

Present perfect: good grammar page

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/presentperfect.html

Conjunctive adverbs

http://grammar.uoregon.edu/conjunctions/conjunctive.html

Specific problems

Review of passive sentence structure

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/539/05/

Gerund or infinitive?

http://www.utoronto.ca/writing/l2ger.html

http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/english-as-a-second-language/gerunds

Subject verb agreement and expressions of quantity

http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/english-as-a-second-language/expressions-of-quantity

How to choose whether to put a comma before WHICH or use THAT in relative clauses

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/645/03/

Gerund (ING) vs relative clause (THAT WHICH)

http://learning.cl3.ust.hk/english-grammar-guide/Word_Form/Gerunds_and_relative_clauses_confusion.htm